Transcending Capitalism of the Employment and the Social Conditions of Working Classes


Classical Bulletin
Special Issue 1, 2018
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.007
Transcending Capitalism of the Employment and the Social Conditions of Working Classes

Harwey David, Ecusso
University of Wisconsin, Department of Sociology, Madison, USA

ABSTRACT
No idea is more closely associated with Marx than the claim that the intrinsic, contradictory dynamics of capitalism ultimately lead to its self-destruction while simultaneously creating conditions favourable for a revolutionary rupture needed to create an emancipatory alternative in which the control by the capitalist class of investments and production is displaced by radical economic democracy. Marx’s formulation of a theory of transcending capitalism is unsatisfactory for two main reasons: 1) the dynamics of capitalism may generate great harms, but they do not inherently make capitalism unsustainable nor do they generate the structural foundations of a collective actor with a capacity to overthrow capitalism; 2) the vision of a system-level rupture with capitalism is not a plausible strategy replacing capitalism by a democratic-egalitarian economic system. Nevertheless, there are four central propositions anchored in the Marxist tradition that remain essential for understanding the possibility of transcending capitalism: 1. Capitalism obstructs the realization of conditions for human flourishing. 2. Another world is possible. 3. Capitalism’s dynamics are intrinsically contradictory. 4. Emancipatory transformation requires popular mobilization and struggle.These four propositions can underwrite a strategic vision of eroding the dominance of capitalism by building democratic-egalitarian economic relations within the contradictory spaces of capitalism.
Keywords: Karl Marx, 200th anniversary, transcendence of capitalism, real utopias, socialism, contradiction, crisis

Targeted program approach in the state environmental policy and its application in the Republic of Azerbaijan


Classical Bulletin
Special Issue 1, 2018
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.006
 
Sevil Imamverdi Mammadova
Academy of Public Administration under the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, E-mail: [email protected]
 
ABSTRACT
The article presents the implementation of the state's ecological policy through targeted programs and reveals essence, features, advantages and disadvantages of targeted program approach and method applied as a systematic approach in solving ecological problems. It analyses practical aspects of the realization of targeted ecological programs in the Republic of Azerbaijan, European Union, US and Russian Federation and gives recommendations and suggestions for providing their efficiency.   
Keywords: state’s ecological policy, the targeted program method, targeted ecological programs, practical aspects, and efficiency

'The moral economy of the English crowd in the eighteenth century'

By: Caroline Walker Bynum
Historical cultural Department of London Univ., UK
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.04.46 
CLASSICAL BULLETIN Volume: 94 Issue: 4 
Pages: 97-108 Published: DEC 2018

Abstract
Cultural history is not to be defined by a set of rules or a distinct subject matter. It is not just, what the English crowddenotes, a study of the activities within the sphere of 'high culture'; nor is it exclusively to be seen as an exercise in interpretation of symbolic acts and rituals of people in the past. Some observers have been frustrated with cultural history that seems at times to be the 'history of everything', not without reason. There is more than a grain of truth in the view that cultural history can be exercised in every field of activity: politics, economics, kinship, gender, religion and all their interlocking and overlapping domains.
Keywords: Moral economy, English crowd, workers

A research about the most formative impact in urging historians


By: Lyndal Roper
International Society for Cultural History, USA
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.04.44 
CLASSICAL BULLETIN Volume: 94 Issue: 4 
Pages: 57-73 Published: DEC 2018

Abstract
Scholars have tried, for instance, to explain how the ascending bourgeoisie influenced various parameters of concert life in the eighteenth and nineteenth century. They have examined changing behavioural patterns of the audience (Müller 2015, Johnson 1994) and a ‘transformation of taste’ (Weber 2000). Most of the studies, however, do not really attempt to explain what role the emotional impact of music itself played. How did audiences experience different musical styles in different contexts? This article approaches this rather difficult question by applying a comparative methodology. The starting point is the observation that the performance contexts of ‘classical’ music were far from being homogeneous. By examining four performances of Ludwig van Beethoven's Leonora Overture No. 3 in highly different social contexts in Berlin from 1895–1907 — ranging from gala concerts of working class choirs, to open air military concerts, to performances in bourgeois circles — this article attempts to illustrate how the analysis of concert contexts can serve as a means to better understand the emotional experiences of concert audiences.
Kewords: historians, important thesis, classical study

Exciting information about workers, working-class politics, peasant economies of Germany

 
By: Joan Wallach Scott
Howard Chiang, University of California, Davis, USA
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.04.43 
CLASSICAL BULLETIN Volume: 94 Issue: 4 
Pages: 42-56 Published: DEC 2018

Abstract
So, for example, alongside a demographic historian who calculates the historical movements of the size of family, or age at marriage, cultural historians probe the ideas about family, obligation, conjugality, with all the contradictions and points of pressure and conflict which they induced in people's lives. Or, alongside the study of doctrine, theology and ecclesiastical structures – areas long studied by historians of religion – cultural historians seek out the practices through which religion was disseminated, experienced, interpreted and applied. This has meant that cultural historians have often also been innovators in the search for sound and viable ways of approaching and identifying ways into the daily lives of people who did not generate a great deal of documentation. Yet, it is wrong to think of cultural history as a 'people's history' alone; its operations are as illuminating when applied to courts, politics and armies; to the art and clothing, literature, grammar and music of the few and privileged.
Keywords: workers, working-class politics, peasant economies of Germany