Anthropological and Sociological reports: social determinism in the ancient time

Classical Bulletin
Issue 2
Summer/Autumn 2016
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Anthropological and Sociological reports: social determinism in the ancient time
By David Morrinston,
South Illinois University, USA
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Abstract
The Beowulf poet's use of the term fehð or feud differs from that of modern anth-ropologists-the poet uses the term to define any ongoing violent intra or inter social conflict, lending it irony and tragedy.
Reprinted with revisions from Philological Quarterly, Winter 1999, 78:77-95.
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Contents:
•Introduction
•The Feud's Reciprocal Character
•The Feud's Ideological Character
•The Feud as Trope
•Conclusion
•Notes
•Bibliography

Analyze of the women, major of the female characters

Classical Bulletin
Issue 2
Summer/Autumn 2016
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Analyze of the women, major of the female characters
By D`harry Clark
Western Michigan University

Abstract: This paper examines the roles of the women in Beowulf, focusing on those of hostess, peaceweavers, and monsters. When read through an anthropo-logical lens, Beowulf presents the female characters as being central both in the story itself and in the society presented in the poem.
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Contents:
•Introduction
•Wealhtheow and Hygd: Woman as Hostess
•Hildeburh and Freawaru: Woman as Peaceweaver
•Grendel's Mother and Thryth: Woman as Monster

Ancient stories on Beowulf

Classical Bulletin
Issue 2
Summer/Autumn 2016
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Ancient stories on Beowulf
by Dorothy N. Bruce
Southern Florida College, USA
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Abstract: This essay explores how Beowulf may have indoctrinated the young warriors hearing the tale. The poem prompts the geoguð (young warriors) to con-sider how they would respond in psychologically threatening situations, and it presents as their model Beowulf, who faces each risk bravely and is justly re-warded.aaaaaa

Good Ancestor; Conduct and Tribal life, recount significant events

Classical Bulletin
Issue 2
Summer/Autumn 2016
Good Ancestor; Conduct and Tribal life, recount significant events

by Oslip Marquize Marinyo
Department of English, University of California at Davis
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Abstract
This essay proposes the idea, based on narrative genres identified both by native tellers of tales and anthropologists, that the Beowulf poet imagines the queens Wealhtheow and Hygd as "consciously" using the stories of women who have lived before them as a means for evaluating and directing their personal lives.

Ancient Queens and the Strategies in Beowulf; Simplest and the attractive Solution


Classical Bulletin
Issue 2
Summer/Autumn 2016
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Ancient Queens and the Strategies in Beowulf; Simplest and the attractive Solution

by Mary Wilpens Morano
Saint Louis University, USA

doi9899764567687673cb6-26.pdf
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ABSTRACT: This essay sets the "Modthrytho Episode" of Beowulf in the context of historical and legendary "wicked queens" in Anglo-Saxon England, and sug-gests that a consistent factor in such stories may be the alternative "cousin strat-egies" available to far-sighted rulers.