Information Technology during the New Globalization of the Critique of the World



Classical Bulletin
Special Issue 1, 2018
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.003
Information Technology during the New Globalization of the Critique of the World
David Harvey
City University of New York, NY, United States

ABSTRACT
This article is part of a debate between David Harvey, Michael Hardt and Toni Negri. It takes Marx’s bicentenary as occasion for an update of his concept of alienation. The paper asks: how are we to interpret universal alienation and from whence does it come? Marx radically reformulated the concept of alienation in the Grundrisse. The humanism of the early Marx can be re-rooted and reconceptualised in the scientific mode proposed in the Grundrisse. In the Grundrisse, the universality of alienation is specific to capitalism’s historical evolution. Today, alienation exists almost everywhere. It exists at work in production, at home in consumption, and it dominates much of politics and daily life. Such trends intensify through the application of information technologies and artificial intelligence. Widespread alienation has resulted in Occupy movements as well as right-wing populism and bigoted nationalist and racist movements. Donald Trump is the President of alienation. The circulation of capital as totality consists of the three key moments of production, circulation and distribution. A lot of contemporary economic struggles are now occurring at the point of realisation rather than at the point of production. Protests are therefore today often expressions of broad-based discontent. Our future is dictated by the need to redeem our debts. Under such conditions democracy becomes a sham. The big question is what forms of social movement can help us get out of the state-finance nexus. The theory of objective alienation along with an understanding of its subjective consequences is one vital key to unlock the door of a progressive politics for the future.
Keywords: Karl Marx, bicentenary, 200th anniversary, alienation, capitalism, Marxist theory
 

Social Onthology and transformation of Capitalism


Classical Bulletin
Special Issue 1, 2018
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.002
Social Onthology and transformation of Capitalism
Polony Karl Zhang
Saint Louis University, USA

ABSTRACT
This contribution is the first part of a debate between Michael Hardt/Toni Negri and David Harvey on the occasion of Marx’s bicentenary. The discussion focuses on the question of what capitalism looks like today and how it can best be challenged. This contribution asks: In what type of capitalist society are we living today? And what is the Marxian praxis that we need to challenge it? First, this paper analyses capitalism in respect to the extraction of value from the common, immaterial labour, digitisation, automation, and finance capital. The greatest abstraction in the productive process of value, in its implementation of languages, codes, immaterial articulations of being together, cooperation, affective elements, and so forth presents also in the multitude the virtuality of an extraordinary potential of resistance and autonomy from capital. Second, the paper discusses what forms of praxis are needed today. Marxian ontology is constituted and always renewed by class struggle, by the material antagonism that distributes the elements of real being and by the continuous excess of value that living labour expresses. Today, we discuss Marxian praxis in a society where intelligence is put to work at the centre of the productive process. Here emerges with great force the theme of the liberation of humans from work, on the basis of the transformations of work. Marx demonstrates how much cognitive and intellectual activity is central to production, and how much fixed capital is mixed with cognitive labour. In this context, the notion of the appropriation of fixed capital is of key importance for class struggles.
Keywords: Marx, bicentenary, 200th anniversary, capitalism, exploitation, praxis

Karl Marx: Debating Capitalism & Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts



Classical Bulletin
Special Issue 1, 2018
     doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.001
Karl Marx: Debating Capitalism & Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts

Walton John David Seddon
University of Westminster, London, UK, [email protected]

ABSTRACT
The financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent regimes of social, political and ideological austerity – accompanied by the rise of new nationalisms and authoritarian forms of capitalism – gave new momentum to critical analyses of contemporary capitalism that are not limited to academic debates, but are starting to penetrate the public arena and mainstream discourse. Current debates focus on the possibility to envision alternatives to rather than alternatives of capitalism. If we want to take the project of envisioning and realising an alternative to capitalism seriously, it becomes clear that we have to move beyond the mere critique of capitalism and have to interpret and put into praxis Marx’s legacy for the relevance of realising alternatives today.

Keywords: Karl Marx, capitalism, class, economic and philosophical Manuscripts

Special Issue I Volume 94, 2018

Special Issue I
Volume 94, 2018


Karl Marx: Debating Capitalism
& Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts/ J.Walton 
p. 4, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.001
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Social Onthology and transformation of Capitalism / P. Karl
p. 13, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.002
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Information Technology during the New Globalisation of the Critique
of the World
/ D. Harvey
p. 22, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.003
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Discussion focuses the International Labour / M. Hardst
p. 38, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.004
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The respectable working class and the Modern Conceptions / D. Harvey
p. 46, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.005
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Targeted program approach in the state environmental policy and its
application in the Republic of Azerbaijan
 / M.Sevil
p. 63, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.006
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Transcending Capitalism of the Employment and the Social Conditions of
Working Classes
 / H.Ecusso
p. 83, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.007
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Revolt of the rising economic cooperation / H.Henry
p. 92, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.008
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Invitation and the establishing of young Generation to the Social Ideas of
Modernism / D. Sarah
p. 111, Classical Bulletin, Special Issue 1, 2018, doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.009
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Author Guidelines
p. 127
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Transcending Capitalism of the Employment and the Social Conditions of Working Classes


Classical Bulletin
Special Issue 1, 2018
doi: 10.33909/cb/94.2018.02.007
Transcending Capitalism of the Employment and the Social Conditions of Working Classes

Harwey David, Ecusso
University of Wisconsin, Department of Sociology, Madison, USA

ABSTRACT
No idea is more closely associated with Marx than the claim that the intrinsic, contradictory dynamics of capitalism ultimately lead to its self-destruction while simultaneously creating conditions favourable for a revolutionary rupture needed to create an emancipatory alternative in which the control by the capitalist class of investments and production is displaced by radical economic democracy. Marx’s formulation of a theory of transcending capitalism is unsatisfactory for two main reasons: 1) the dynamics of capitalism may generate great harms, but they do not inherently make capitalism unsustainable nor do they generate the structural foundations of a collective actor with a capacity to overthrow capitalism; 2) the vision of a system-level rupture with capitalism is not a plausible strategy replacing capitalism by a democratic-egalitarian economic system. Nevertheless, there are four central propositions anchored in the Marxist tradition that remain essential for understanding the possibility of transcending capitalism: 1. Capitalism obstructs the realization of conditions for human flourishing. 2. Another world is possible. 3. Capitalism’s dynamics are intrinsically contradictory. 4. Emancipatory transformation requires popular mobilization and struggle.These four propositions can underwrite a strategic vision of eroding the dominance of capitalism by building democratic-egalitarian economic relations within the contradictory spaces of capitalism.
Keywords: Karl Marx, 200th anniversary, transcendence of capitalism, real utopias, socialism, contradiction, crisis